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Foods you’ve never seen

Since it is located near Kyoto and Nara, former capitals of Japan before Tokyo, Arima onsen had long been loved by the Imperial family, nobility and cultured people. From the description in the 8th century, down to the reference in the ‘Pillow Book’ written by ‘Sei Shonagon’ in the 11th century, then ‘Toyotomi Hideyoshi’, the de facto ruler of the day, frequented here in the 16th century to develop...

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There are sake festivals, many sake breweries across the country and dozens of different brands and tastes to try in all regions of Japan. So just what is sake and why is it so popular? What is Sake? In Japanese the word sake actually means “alcohol”, referring to beer, wine, or any hard liquor. When you order sake in a restaurant, most waiters will clarify what kind of alcohol you are referring to. Most people think of Japanese sake...

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Unagi Cuisine in Narita City


Posted By on Dec 17, 2013

  Entering Kikuya, visitors are welcomed to an old-fashioned world of antique furniture and delicate unagi (eel) dishes. Traditional preparation passed on from generation to generation – for 270 years – is quite noticeable in the beautifully mastered meals served in the 300-year-old house. Tucked into a private room upstairs or seated alongside others on the lower floor, customers can enjoy the highest quality and freshness of...

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A Taste of Sake in Narita City


Posted By on Dec 5, 2013

At the mouth of Omotesando Street stands an old sake shop, Takizawa Honten. Welcomed by the owner, visitors are treated to complimentary sake tasting. The sweet, cool liquid flows gently down the throat. It’s important to remind ourselves that it’s alcohol. Although the shop is also stocked with wines and beers, the specialty is sake, specifically that produced in Narita: Chomeisen. Takizawa Honten “Chomeisen” Brewery was founded in...

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Narita City: Omotesando Street


Posted By on Dec 3, 2013

Leading visitors from Narita Station to Narita-san Temple, Omotesando Street is a glimpse of the traditional market streets of Japan. From sake to sembei (rice crackers), vendors in old shops have sold their wares for generations on this street. Even the large confectionary shop, modernized and enlarged to satisfy a greater number of customers and international visitors, retains the flavors that have become a part of traditional food...

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  Arashiyama is a bit of a romantic destination and it’s a great example of picture-perfect, traditional Japan. You’ll often see people dressed in kimono walking through the small alleyways and rickshaws running past carrying customers. While there are a few temples and other points of interest, such as the Bamboo Grove, what I love most about Arashiyama are all of its small shops. The main road is lined with small,...

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