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Shizuoka

Community Life on the Izu Peninsula

Community Life on the Izu Peninsula


Posted By on Apr 7, 2014

The historic port town of Shimoda sits quietly overlooking the sea on the Izu Peninsula in Shizuoka prefecture. Approximately 180 km from Tokyo, a weekend in Shimoda makes for a restful, short escape from the city hustle. Stepping off the train, everything suddenly appears slower yet full of life. Right outside the station, a weekend market brings energy to the surroundings. Elderly folks in gardening apparel sell goods at market...

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Izu Travels: Ohmuro Mountain

Izu Travels: Ohmuro Mountain


Posted By on Apr 3, 2014

Mt. Omuro is an old volcano, about 4,000 years old, located about 130 kilometers southwest of Shibuya, Tokyo, on the Izu Peninsula of Shizuoka prefecture. The mountain, some 580m tall, has an incredible view of the sea and Mt. Fuji on clear days. Despite the strong winds at the top, visitors come to enjoy the beautiful surroundings and fresh air. For 500 yen, visitors can purchase round-trip lift tickets to the top of the mountain. At...

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Izu-Kougen Station, located on the Izu Peninsula of Shizuoka prefecture, is about 130 km from Tokyo, making it an easy weekend getaway for city dwellers. Known for its hot springs and ocean views, among other highlights, Izu Peninsula is a favorite mini-getaway of nearby prefectures. Upon leaving the station on the weekend of March 22-23, visitors were welcomed by a large craft market and blossoming pink trees. Those enticed by an...

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There are fifty-seven thousand pine trees in “Miho-no-matsubara”.  The distant view of Mt.Fuji seen from here particularly in Winter is stunning, and Utagawa Hiroshige the great “ukiyo-e” woodblock print artist from the 18th to 19th century depicted this scenery.  This place is the setting for an old tale of the celestial robe of an angel and the six-hundred year old pine tree as shown in the first picture...

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“Tokugawa Ieyasu”, de facto ruler of Japan early in the 17th century, was pulling the strings behind the scenes in Sunpu Castle in Shizuoka City after handing over the reigns of power to his son “Hidetada”, the second shogun.  He passed away in 1616 and was buried immediately on the top of a hill called “Kunosan” in accordance with his dying wish. The first picture shows his grave there. After that,...

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Speaking of Japanese tea, many non-Japanese people think of ‘matcha” for tea ceremony.  This green tea is produced by grinding tea leaves with a hand mill and the tea leaves are elaborately grown under sunshades.  Japanese people don’t usually drink this kind of tea, in that it is likely to be expensive. “Sencha” green tea, whilst, is widely drunk in Japan.  “Sencha” is classified broadly into...

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