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Walk the Streets That Samurais Walked- KANAZAWA BUKEYASHIKI

Posted By on Sep 18, 2015

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General Information About Kanazawa Bukeyashiki

Ever wondered what a neighborhood looked like when Samurais ruled Japan?

Well, you’re in luck.

Kanazawa Bukeyashiki will show you exactly what the streets and neighborhoods looked like during the Japanese feudal period.

You don’t need any fancy Samurai armor or swords– just bring your Samurai attitude– to enjoy this quaint experience in the heart of Kanazawa, a city filled with history and culture.

Kanazawa Bukeyashiki (2)

Antique yellow dirt walls surround the former Samurai homes.

The streets are narrow and personal, preserving the exact ambience of the feudal era.

Some may call it “time slipping,” or traveling into the past…

Kanazawa Bukeyashiki (9)

Pass through one of the gates, and you will understand what the feeling was like for a Samurai visiting another Samurai, a friend visiting a Samurai, or a sweetheart visiting a Samurai…

Some of the former Samurai houses are open as free exhibits, and visitors may not only enjoy the exterior but also appreciate the architectural beauty from the inside.

Kanazawa Bukeyashiki (8)

 

 

After Sunset at the Bukeyashiki 

Let the sun set at the Kanazawa City Bukeyashiki, and you are bound to experience an even more intimate experience.

Kanazawa Bukeyashiki (6)

The Samurais, after ending a day of work, negotiation, or perhaps war, came home to recuperate and rewind.

As the sun sets in this beautifully preserved historical town, you will see a completely different face of Bukeyashiki– perhaps you will start to hear imaginary sounds of drunken Samurais laughing and chatting away with their friends and family, resting for the evening.

Recuperation was a big part of Samurai life– after all, who can work so tirelessly without anything to come home to?

All work no play would make a very boring Samurai!

Kanazawa Bukeyashiki (3)

The Nagamachi Training School building had been in existence for over 130 years, and the students of the Kanazawa Institute of Traditional Crafts renovated it to preserve its beauty and history as a community home to artists and craftspersons.

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Today the building continues to be used for all kinds of Japanese traditional arts and crafts such as Japanese Minyo singing, Japanese Hayashi instrument playing, Japanese tea ceremony; for educational use to familiarize visitors with the history of Bukeyashiki; and to serve as a classroom for Kanazawa Institute of Traditional Crafts students.

Basically, it is an all-purpose community center!

If you’re lucky, you might stumble upon an event open to the public, so make sure to check with the local visitor’s center for more information.

Kanazawa Bukeyashiki (5)

As the day comes to an end, the home entrances light up, getting ready for night life.

Let your imagination go wild in this former Samurai town.

Walk the walk that myriad Samurais took back home after a long day of socializing and strategizing.

Who knows?

You might be writing the next epic Samurai novel inspired by Kanazawa Bukeyashiki.

Kanazawa Bukeyashiki (4)

 

Related Tours:
4-Day Takayama Holiday : Mt. Fuji, Hakone, Takayama, Shirakawa-go, & Kanazawa from Tokyo (Round Trip Plan)
3-Day Takayama Holiday : Takayama, Shirakawa-go & Kanazawa from Nagoya
9-Day Japan Combination Package from Tokyo (Round Trip): Tokyo, Kamakura, Mt. Fuji, Takayama, Shirakawa-go, Kanazawa & Kyoto

 

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Explore Japan’s top destinations with the help of JTB Sunrise Tours
Search JTB’s Special discounted Airfare to Japan and Asia

 

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