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“Tokugawa Ieyasu”, the founder of the Tokugawa Shogunate which lasted in peace for 250 years, was buried on the top of “Kunosan” in Shizuoka.

Posted By on Sep 27, 2012

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“Tokugawa Ieyasu”, de facto ruler of Japan early in the 17th century, was pulling the strings behind the scenes in Sunpu Castle in Shizuoka City after handing over the reigns of power to his son “Hidetada”, the second shogun.  He passed away in 1616 and was buried immediately on the top of a hill called “Kunosan” in accordance with his dying wish. The first picture shows his grave there. After that, “Hidetada” built a shrine for “Ieyasu”, which is “Kunosan Toshogu”. “Shaden” main building of this shrine, designated as a national treasure, is shown in the second picture.  This architectural style is what is called “gongen-zukuri” and is the prototype of all “toshogu” shrines throughout Japan. “Ieyasu’s” remains are said to have been moved to “Nikko Toshogu” shrine by the third shogun “Iemitsu”, where a similar grave of “Ieyasu” can be found.  It is uncertain which shrine  “Ieyasu” is sleeping, in Shizuoka or Nikko.

By Masahisa Takaki.

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