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Mie

In the Shinto religion, the most important deity is Amaterasu, goddess of the Sun. After all, the sun is very important to the people of Japan and its symbolism is very prevalent, such as the nickname “Land of the Rising Sun.”  It is believed that Amaterasu helped shape ancient Japan with her siblings Susanoo and Tsukuyomi, and that the Japanese emperors are direct descendants of Amaterasu. It is no wonder that the shrine dedicated to...

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Located a 20 minutes from Toba station and is theme park Chonmage World. Chonmage is the name of the hairstyle historically worn by samurai during the Edo and surrounding periods. So why is this theme park named after an old hairstyle? Because it’s a historical theme park! It was a small theme park showing you what the time of samurai and ninja was like, complete with a recreation of Oda Nobunaga’s castle (the original was...

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Mount Gozaisho (御在所岳) is part of the Suzuka Mountains in Komono on the border of Mie and Shiga Prefectures. It is the tallest peak in the range of mountains, and the only mountain in all of Mie that has a ropeway. Opened in 1959, the Gozaisho Ropeway is said to be the longest ropeway in Japan, and will take you all the way up to the peak from the foot of the mountain. The carriages are all large and have giant windows that provide a...

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Iga is a small province in the Mie prefecture. Although it is not often visited by tourists, Iga makes a great stopping location from Nara or Ise. Almost every province in Japan has some sort of regional specialty, whether it’s food or handicrafts, and Iga is famous for Iga kumihimo. Kumihimo is a type of string art made by braiding. Historically, the were often used by samurai on their armor for both functional and decorative...

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The gods or spirits of ‘Shintoism’, Japan’s native religion, are thought to exist as natural objects such as trees, mountains, sea, rocks, etc. On this ground, many big rocks sticking out of the surface of the sea have been regarded as the place where ‘Shinto’ gods abide and thus they are an objects of worship with a ‘torii’ gate and a sacred straw rope like a shrine. Among these divine rocks,...

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In most cases, ‘Shinto’ shrines in Japan is laid out in forests or groves because ‘Shintoism’ is a polytheistic religion based on nature worship. Like the river in the picture above, Japanese people have made good use of stream when they have to purify themself before worshipping since time immemorial. In the course of time, like in the picture above, a special-purpose installation has come to be made. Thus,...

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