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Wakayama

Kiikatsuura: Small Town Pleasantries

Kiikatsuura: Small Town Pleasantries


Posted By on Jun 3, 2015

Descending the stairs from Kiikatsuura Station in Wakayama, visitors are immediately taken back in time to slow life in seaside Japan. Near the exit, a footbath awaits those with time to kill before the next train – which in small-town Japan is often every hour or so – and the bus station beckons from across the rotunda. At any time of day, there is a silent buzz of life though residents are far and few. Small coastal towns like...

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Climbing down the rocky steps to Nachi no Taki, it is difficult to be ready for the astounding sight you are about to witness. A simple shrine area and shop sit on the stone plaza with an incredible view of the famous waterfall. For 300 yen, visitors can ascend the rocky stairs beyond the shrine to a raised platform overlooking the waterfall. On the way to this platform, there is an area in which worshippers can purchase a small plate...

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Kansai’s Wakayama Castle

Kansai’s Wakayama Castle


Posted By on Sep 22, 2014

In the beautiful city of Wakayama in the Kansai region of Japan, there stands a castle that serves as the symbol of the town. Built upon Mount Torafusu, meaning “tiger leaning on its side”, Wakayama Castle has a fierce foundation that matches the prestige of the castle. The iconic daimyo Toyotomi Hideyoshi captured the area on which Wakayama castle stands in 1585. However, it was Hideyoshi’s brother Toyotomi Hidenaga who...

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Located near Nara and Osaka, deep within Nachi mountain of Wakayama prefecture lays a majestic waterfall. This waterfall has been a pilgrimage site for Shinto believers since the Heian period (about 800 to 1200 A.D.) It is no wonder that this place is considered sacred ground with the Shinto belief. Believing that there is a kami living in everything, the large waterfall, thick forests, and surroundings give this place an awe...

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Located high in the mountains in Wakayama, Japan, lays Mount Koya, which is the center of Shingon Buddhism. Despite being isolated and a bit further out from any major city, Mount Koya is actually relatively easy to get to, however it will involve taking multiple modes of transportation unless you have your own car. All of the effort it takes to get to the small mountain village is worth it once you arrive. Mount Koya is filled with...

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As a commemoration to his deceased mother, Toyotomi Hideyoshi constructed Kongobuji back in the late 1500s. Although it was originally used as a home, it was later merged with the neighboring temples where it became the head temple of Shingon Buddhism, which is headquartered in Koyasan. To enter the temple, visitors must first take off their shoes and pay a small admission fee. For those who are wondering if it is worth it to pay the...

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